Changes to civil partnerships

March 20, 2015

Humanist Society Scotland has responded to a paper by the Scottish Government on changing civil partnerships registered outwith Scotland to marriages in Scotland.

HSS feels strongly that couples who are currently in a civil partnership from outwith Scotland should be able to change that to a legal marriage in Scotland.

Speaking on the issue Gary McLelland, HSS Policy and Public Affairs Officer said:

“Last year the Scottish Government granted same-sex couples in Scotland the right to marry, and HSS has been one of the organisations privileged to celebrate these happy occasions.

“we’ve already received many requests from couples who are currently in civil partnerships from outside Scotland, and who want to change that to a marriage in Scotland.

“We fully support the detailed work of the Equality Network and the Scottish Transgender Alliance, and hope the Scottish Government will give these proposals serious attention.

The HSS response to this paper can be viewed here, and the detailed work of the Equality Network and Scottish Transgender Alliance here.

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