Religion and a new Scottish constitution

April 6, 2014

The Humanist Society Scotland strongly disagrees with the suggestion today that there should be special recognition of religion in any future constitution for Scotland. In the most recent Scottish Household Survey, 43% of Scots reported they had no religion. This means that any written constitution should be secular in nature and be clear that Scotland is a place for people of no faith as well as for all of those with a faith.

Douglas McLellan, Chief Executive of the Humanist Society Scotland stated:

“No group should be given a special recognition over any other and we call upon the Scottish Government, when it releases its draft Constitution, to ensure that it represents all of the people of Scotland”

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